Program rubric

The College of Education at the University of Phoenix is guided by its own mission and purpose that directs our work with teacher candidates and professional educators. Our programs encompass the initial preparation of professional educators, graduate level degrees, and professional development courses and programs. The College of Education is leader in innovative educational solutions for developing educators, impacting K-12 students, and meeting school needs by:

  • Offering a comprehensive set of programs that recognize and address the developmental process of teaching and learning in a diverse society.
  • Employing a practitioner faculty who are recognized as experts in the educational community.
  • Using integrated technologies to impact learning.
  • Emphasizing assessment and self-assessment of teaching and learning on a continuing basis.
  • "Sharing our model and best practices with our colleagues.

The Board of Directors, Presidents, and other executive administrators of the University of Phoenix support in full the vision and mission of the College of Education.

Charlotte Danielson and Thomas McGreal (2000) discussed the evolution of teacher practices from clinical supervision models of the 1960's to models based on authentic pedagogy, engaged teaching and learning, and teaching for understanding. This has resulted in the need to structure assessment of teachers in such a way as to recognize quality in the classroom. Evaluation systems should be linked to the mission of the school and district, should be tied to professional development, and should be based on specific outcomes.

Domain One: Planning & Preparation

Basic

Developing

Proficient

Advanced

1A

Knowledge of Content and Pedagogy

The teacher’s knowledge of content, pedagogy, and technology are minimal and do not reflect current research or best practices in the field. The teacher’s knowledge of content, pedagogy, and technology are fair and sometimes reflect current research or best practices in the field. The teacher’s knowledge of content, pedagogy, and technology are good and usually reflect current research, as well as best practices in the field. The teacher’s knowledge of content, pedagogy, and technology are solid and always reflect current research, as well as best practices in the field.
1B

Instructional Planning and Resources

The teacher fails to establish high expectations for students or to use clear goals that reflect different types of learning needs; he/she uses minimal or no resources to enhance student learning. The teacher establishes high expectations for some students; clear goals reflecting different types of learning needs are not consistently established; he/she uses some resources to enhance student learning. The teacher regularly establishes high expectations for all students, using clear goals that reflect most types of learning needs; he/she uses a variety of resources, often including technology, to enhance student learning. The teacher always establishes high expectations for all students, using clear goals that reflect all different types of learning needs; he/she uses a wide variety of resources, including technology, to enhance student learning.
1C

Instructional Design

The teacher is unable to design instructional activities that are appropriate for students; instruction is not aligned with established goals or state standards; there is no evidence of technology support. The teacher usually designs instructional activities that are appropriate for students, but are not are aligned with established goals and state standards, or supported by technology. The teacher consistently designs instructional activities that are appropriate for students, are aligned with established goals and state standards, and are usually supported by technology. The teacher always designs instructional activities that are appropriate for students, are aligned with established goals and state standards, and are supported by technology.
1D

Assessment

The teacher uses few strategies to assess instructional goals; he/she is unable to establish clear criteria and does not communicate criteria to students; results are not used to plan for individual, group and diverse needs. The teacher uses a few strategies and incorporates some technology to assess instructional goals; he/she establishes minimal criteria that have been communicated to some students; results are not consistently used to plan for individual, group and diverse needs. The teacher uses many strategies and often incorporates technology to assess instructional goals; he/she establishes clear criteria that have been communicated to most students and usually uses results to plan for individual, group and diverse needs. The teacher uses a wide variety of strategies and incorporates technology to assess instructional goals; he/she establishes clear criteria that have been communicated to all students and uses results to plan for individual, group and diverse needs.

Domain Two: Learning Environment

Basic

Developing

Proficient

Advanced

2A

Managing Classroom Procedures

The teacher is unable to organize or manage tasks for individuals or groups; transitions between activities are non-existent; there are no systems in place to manage non-instructional duties or schedules. The teacher attempts to organize and manage tasks for individuals and groups; some transitions between activities occur, though not smoothly; some systems for managing non-instructional duties, including technology and scheduling, are in place. The teacher organizes and manages tasks for individuals and groups; transitions between activities usually occur smoothly; efficient systems for managing non-instructional duties, including technology and scheduling, are in place. The teacher effectively organizes and manages tasks for individuals and groups; transitions always occur smoothly; very efficient systems for managing non-instructional duties, including technology and scheduling, are firmly in place.
2B

Managing Student Behavior

The teacher does not establish clear standards of conduct or effectively monitor student behavior; disciplinary actions are generally inappropriate and do not support the dignity of the learning community. The teacher establishes some standards of conduct and occasionally monitors student behavior; disciplinary actions are sometimes appropriate, but do not always support the dignity of the learning community. The teacher consistently establishes clear standards of conduct and monitors student behavior; disciplinary actions are generally appropriate and support the dignity of the learning community. The teacher always establishes clear standards of conduct and effectively monitors student behavior; disciplinary actions are appropriate and truly support the dignity of the learning community.
2C

Creating a Positive Learning Environment

The teacher does not establish a learning community that is safe, warm, caring; it is inappropriate for diverse populations and does not support a variety of developmental or cultural norms; interactions are impolite and disrespectful; students are rarely engaged in learning; technology is not used to enhance student learning. The teacher attempts to establish a learning community that is safe, warm, caring, but it does not support diversity and is not always appropriate for a variety of developmental or cultural norms; interactions are sometimes polite and respectful; students are occasionally actively engaged in learning; the use of technology rarely enhances student learning. The teacher establishes a learning community that is safe, warm, and caring, usually appropriate for diverse populations and supports a variety of developmental and cultural norms; interactions are generally polite and respectful; students are consistently and actively engaged in learning; the use of technology often enhances student learning. The teacher establishes a solid learning community that is safe, warm, and caring, is appropriate for diverse populations and supports all developmental and cultural norms; interactions are polite and respectful; all students are actively engaged in learning; the use of technology clearly enhances student learning.

Domain Three: Instruction

Basic

Developing

Proficient

Advanced

3A

Communication

The teacher is unable to model good verbal and/or written skills to communicate instruction and/or classroom procedures; feedback is rarely provided in a timely manner and is often of poor quality; the teacher’s vocabulary and communication style do not reflect sensitivity to gender and cultural issues and are not appropriate for diverse student populations. The teacher models average verbal and written skills, which are sometimes enhanced by technology, to communicate instruction and/or classroom procedures; feedback is inconsistently provided or is not timely; the teacher’s vocabulary and communication style sometimes reflect sensitivity to gender and cultural issues and are occasionally appropriate for diverse student populations. The teacher models good verbal and written skills, usually enhanced by technology, to communicate instruction and classroom procedures; high-quality feedback is regularly provided in a timely manner; the teacher’s vocabulary and communication style usually reflect sensitivity to gender and cultural issues and are generally appropriate for diverse student populations. The teacher models excellent verbal and written skills, often enhanced by technology, to clearly communicate instruction and classroom procedures; high-quality feedback is always provided in a timely manner; the teacher’s vocabulary and communication style consistently reflect sensitivity to gender and cultural issues and are appropriate for diverse student populations.
3B

Student Engagement

The teacher is unable to design instructional activities that accurately represent content or that are cognitively appropriate for any students; the resource materials, as well as the structure and pacing of the lesson is generally ineffective; the teacher’s questioning strategies are of poor quality; technology is rarely used to develop students’ higher order thinking skills and creativity. The teacher sometimes designs instructional activities that accurately represent content or that are cognitively appropriate for some students; the resource materials, as well as the structure and pacing of the lesson is sometimes effective; the teacher’s questioning strategies are of average quality; technology is occasionally used to develop students’ higher order thinking skills and creativity. The teacher regularly designs instructional activities that accurately represent content and that are cognitively appropriate for most students; the resource materials, as well as the structure and pacing of the lesson is generally effective; the teacher’s questioning strategies are of good quality; technology is regularly used to develop students’ higher order thinking skills and creativity. The teacher always designs instructional activities that accurately represent content and that are cognitively appropriate for all students; the resource materials, as well as the structure and pacing of the lesson is extremely effective; the teacher’s questioning strategies are of the highest quality; technology is often used to develop students’ higher order thinking skills and creativity.
3C

Diversity

The teacher is unable to modify his/her lessons or teaching style to accommodate the needs of diverse learning styles; he/she does not accommodate student questions or interests and is unable able to smoothly make adjustments to lessons, if needed; the teacher never uses technology to address the diverse needs of students. The teacher is sometimes able to modify his/her lessons or teaching style to accommodate the needs of diverse learning styles; he/she sometimes accommodates student questions or interests but is unable to smoothly make adjustments to lessons, if needed; the teacher rarely uses technology to address the diverse needs of students. The teacher is usually able to modify his/her lessons and teaching style to accommodate the needs of diverse learning styles; he/she consistently accommodates student questions/interests and is able to smoothly make adjustments to lessons, as needed; the teacher often uses technology to address the diverse needs of students. The teacher is always able to modify his/her lessons and teaching style to accommodate the needs of diverse learning styles; he/she successfully accommodates student questions/interests and is able to smoothly make adjustments to lessons, as needed; the teacher regularly uses technology to address the diverse needs of students.

Domain Four: The Professional Educator

Basic

Developing

Proficient

Advanced

4A

Parent and Community Involvement

The teacher fails to provide information to families about student learning and achievement and does not actively seek to engage them in the educational process; the teacher does not volunteer to participate in professional organizations or in school/community projects; the teacher does not identify or use community resources to foster student learning. The teacher rarely provides information to families about student learning and achievement and rarely seeks to engage them in the educational process; the teacher rarely volunteers to participate in professional organizations or in school/community projects; the teacher occasionally identifies and uses community resources to foster student learning. The teacher frequently provides information to families about student learning and achievement and actively seeks to engage them in the educational process; the teacher sometimes volunteers to participate in professional organizations and in school/community projects; the teacher can identify and often uses community resources to foster student learning. The teacher regularly provides detailed information to families about student learning and achievement and actively seeks to engage them in the educational process; the teacher frequently volunteers to participate in professional organizations and in school/community projects; the teacher regularly identifies and uses community resources to foster student learning.
4B

Professionalism

The teacher has failed to establish a system for maintaining information on student progress; he/she does not serve as an advocate for students; the teacher is unable able to assesses his/her own professional growth or seek opportunities for development; the teacher does not work as a team player within the school community and is unable to maintain an open mind in decision-making processes; the teacher does not understand apply ethical, legal and human issues surrounding the use if technology; the teacher does not use technology to enhance productivity or professional practice. The teacher has established a minimal system for maintaining information on student progress and serves as an advocate for a few students; the teacher is unable to consistently assesses his/her own professional growth or seek out opportunities for development; the teacher rarely works as a team player within the school community or maintains an open mind in decision-making processes; the teacher has minimal understanding ethical, legal and human issues surrounding the use if technology; the teacher rarely uses technology to enhance productivity and professional practice. The teacher has established a basic system for maintaining information on student progress and serves as an advocate for his/her students; the teacher is frequently able to assesses his/her own professional growth and often seeks out opportunities for development; the teacher generally works as a team player within the school community and maintains an open mind in decision-making; the teacher usually understands and applies ethical, legal and human issues surrounding the use if technology; the teacher often uses technology to enhance productivity and professional practice. The teacher has established a comprehensive system for maintaining information on student progress and serves as an advocate for all students; the teacher is able to assesses his/her own professional growth and regularly seeks out opportunities for development; the teacher works as a team player within the school community and maintains an open mind decision-making processes; the teacher understands and applies ethical, legal and human issues surrounding the use if technology; the teacher uses technology to enhance productivity and professional practice.
4C

Reflection

The teacher fails to use observations, student information, technology, or professional literature to reflect on the effectiveness of instructional and/or assessment techniques; he/she cannot make suggestions or implement practices to make improvements. The teacher rarely uses observations, student information, technology, or professional literature to reflect on the effectiveness of instructional and/or assessment techniques; he/she sometimes makes limited suggestions or implements practices to make improvements. The teacher often uses observations, student information, technology, and professional literature to reflect on the effectiveness of instructional and assessment techniques; he/she can make general suggestions and implement practices to make improvements. The teacher regularly uses observations, student information, technology, and professional literature to reflect on the effectiveness of instructional and assessment techniques; he/she can make specific suggestions and implement sound practices to make improvements.